Tag Archives: Bread

Sourdough-Sage Dressing

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I’ve just recently discovered how much I like making recipes with fresh sage! After making some White Cheddar and Sage Biscuits, I was wanting to try something else with fresh sage. While I was looking through recipes, I also found out, conveniently, that my friend Denise had a big patch of sage growing in her garden and she was willing to share it! She said her plant is very hearty and stays alive through the winter. So, here’s what I came up with…Sourdough-Sage Dressing…because I thought sourdough bread would be a great combination with  sage, onion, and celery.  There’s also fresh parsley in this–I have parsley growing in a pot and it’s great to always have it on hand! This dressing is very buttery and savory…so if you like that type of thing, you really must try this!

I also learned something new when I was deciding what to name this recipe. I wasn’t sure if I should call it dressing or stuffing, because I didn’t know what the difference was. Well, I found the answer at eHow.com–dressing and stuffing differ in these ways:

Preparation: The key difference between dressing and stuffing is the method of preparation. Dressing can be prepared separately from the bird on the stove top, either from scratch or a store-bought mix. Stuffing, however, is made by stuffing the mixture into the cavity of the bird and cooking them in the oven together. 

Time: Another difference between stuffing and dressing is in the time needed to prepare it. Stuffing inside the bird must be cooked as long as the bird needs to cook, and also increases the cooking time of the bird. Dressing can be made quickly on the stove top or in the oven; either way it will take less time than stuffing.

Flavor: Stuffing made inside the bird can pick up flavors from the bird and impart flavors to the bird. This may be desirable or undesirable depending on the method of preparing the bird. The flavor of dressing depends solely on its ingredients.

So this recipe is definitely dressing. Consider yourself informed on the dressing/stuffing question! 🙂

SOURDOUGH-SAGE DRESSING by NancyCreative

Makes a 9 x 13″ pan, about 8 to 10 servings

  • 1 loaf sourdough bread (my loaf was 1 lb. 4 oz. and I did not use the end slices), with slices cut into 1″ pieces (or you can cut them smaller if you want)
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
  • 3/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 1/3 cup yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 1 1/3 cup celery, finely chopped
  • 4 to 5 Tablespoons fresh sage leaves, finely chopped
  • 4 Tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped (or use 4 teaspoons dried parsley)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder (optional)
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can chicken broth (this dressing can be a little on the dry side in some places, so if you like your dressing more moist, add an extra 1/4 to 1/3 cup chicken broth).

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Spread out pieces of bread onto a large baking sheet and let dry out at least 6 hours or overnight.

In large skillet, melt butter over medium heat, then add olive oil and stir to blend well. Saute onion and celery in this mixture until tender.

In large bowl, mix together bread pieces, onion-celery mixture, sage, parsley, salt, and pepper (and garlic powder, if using), tossing to coat all the bread pieces. Spoon this mixture into a 9 x 13″ pan and pour chicken broth evenly over entire mixture. Cover with foil and bake at 350˚F for 30 minutes, uncovering the last 10 minutes of baking time. Serve immediately.

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This would be a great Thanksgiving side dish, if you’re still looking for ideas! Are you making dressing or stuffing for your Thanksgiving meal?

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Oatmeal Maple Bread from The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day–and a Giveaway!

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You’ve probably heard about the bestselling book Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, first published back in 2007. Because of its popularity, authors Jeff Hertzberg, M.D. and NewArtisanBreadZoe Francois have completely revised and updated their original book that revolutionized bread-making. Their new book,  The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day was just released on October 22. The publisher, Thomas Dunne Books, sent me a review copy, and I’m happy to say they are providing a copy for me to give away! They will send the giveaway copy directly to the winner, so see the end of the post for details on how to win this book! First, I’ll tell you more about the book and the recipe I made from it.

The New Artisan Bread In Five Minutes a Day is completely revised and updated with forty new full-color images, one hundred black-and-white how-to photos, an expanded “Tips and Techniques” section, a gluten-free chapter, and more than 30 new recipes for homemade breads and sweets, including…

  • Gluten-free Cheesy Breadsticks, Pizza, Baguette and Sweeet Brioche
  • Beer-Cheese and Crock-Pot Bread
  • Pretzel Buns
  • Apple-Stuffed French Toast
  • Panini

I decided to try the recipe for Oatmeal Maple Bread–that just sounded so good and healthy! I definitely am a novice bread maker, so I wasn’t sure how it would turn out. I’m happy to say it turned out wonderfully! The bread has a great texture and rises nicely, and pure maple syrup gives it a delicious, slightly sweet taste. This recipe makes 2 loaves. I brought some of the bread in to work for my coworkers to sample and everyone loved it! I hope you get a chance to try the recipe out!

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OATMEAL MAPLE BREAD from The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

Makes two 8 1/2 x 4 1/2″ loaves

A note from the book: This high-fiber loaf is lightly sweetened with maple syrup and tastes great cut into thick slices and then slathered with butter (and marmalade)…. It also makes a great sandwich with smoked turkey and cheese.

  • 2 3/4 cups (625 grams) lukewarm water
  • 1 Tablespoon (10 grams) Granulated yeast
  • 1 to 1 1/2 Tablespoons (17 to 25 grams) Kosher salt
  • 3/4 cup, plus 1 Tablespoon (170 grams) Pure Maple Syrup (the 1 Tablespoon is for brushing on top of the loaf right before baking)
  • 1/4 cup (55 grams) oil, plus more for greasing the loaf pans (I used olive oil)
  • 3/4 cup (55 grams) Wheat bran
  • 1 1/2 cups (140 grams) Old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup (130 grams) Whole wheat flour or White Whole wheat flour (I used White whole wheat)
  • 4 cups (570 grams) All-purpose flour (I used unbleached all-purpose flour)
  1. Mixing and storing the dough: Mix the yeast and salt with the water, the 3/4 cup maple syrup, and the oil in a 6-quart bowl or a lidded (not airtight) food container.
  2. Mix in the remaining dry ingredients without kneading, using a spoon or a heavy-duty stand mixer (with paddle). If you’re not using a machine, you may need to use wet hands to incorporate the last bit of flour.
  3. Cover (not airtight) and allow to rest at room temperature until the dough rises and collapses (or flattens on top), approximately 2 hours.
  4. The dough can be used immediately after the initial rise, though it is easier to handle when cold. Refrigerate the container of dough and use over the next 7 days.
  5. On baking day, grease two 8 1/2 x 4 1/2-inch nonstick loaf pans. Dust the surface of the refrigerated dough with flour and divide dough in half. Dust each dough half with more flour and quickly shape each of them, one at a time, into a ball by stretching the surface of each piece of dough around to the bottom on all four sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go.
  6. Elongate each ball of dough to form an oval loaf and place into the prepared pans. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 90 minutes.
  7. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. A baking stone is not required, and omitting it shortens the preheat.
  8. Using a pastry brush, brush the top crusts with the remaining 1 Tablespoon maple syrup (use 1/2 Tablespoon on the top of each loaf).
  9. Place the loaves on a rack near the center of the oven. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes or until browned and firm (my baking time was 50 minutes). Smaller or larger loaves will require adjustments in resting and baking time.
  10. Remove from the pans and allow to cool on a rack before slicing and eating.

I let my loaves cool before slicing one of them and put the other in the freezer for later. But you may not be able to resist eating this bread warm right out of the oven! 🙂

9781250018281GIVEAWY IS NOW CLOSED. The winning comment was #5, Barbara. Congratulations!

Now for the Giveaway…if you’d like to enter to win a copy of The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, leave a comment on this blog post between now and Saturday, November 9, at midnight (CST)–the random drawing will be made from the comments on this post only! The winner will be chosen randomly via Random.org and announced on Sunday, November 10. Winner will be notified via email (if winner does not respond in 3 days, I’ll do another drawing). Giveaway limited to readers in the Continental U.S. and Canada.

First entry: Leave a comment on this post–it would be great to hear what your favorite kind of bread is or if you have ever made homemade bread!

Bonus entry: If you are a new or existing follower or subscriber, you can leave one extra comment telling me the way (or ways) you are following.

This is a great book for bread lovers, so if you’re one, be sure to enter the giveaway! 🙂

French Onion Turkey Casserole

Hope you enjoyed your Thanksgiving weekend! If you have any turkey left over from the big meal, here’s a recipe you may want to try out! I found this recipe for French Onion Turkey Casserole at CampbellsKitchen.com. As I typically do, though, I added extra cheese to this, and I’m glad I did–I thought it was great with the extra cheese!

The original recipe calls this dish a “savory bread pudding,” and I think that’s a good way to describe it–it’s not super-meaty, but the bread, French Onion soup, and cheese give it a nice texture and flavor. It is mildly savory, by the way, so for those of you who like your food a little more seasoned, you may want to add 1/4 teaspoon of salt to the mixture. And the savory flavor seemed a little stronger to me the next day, when I ate some of what was left over, so this is one of those recipes that tastes good even when it sits refrigerated overnight!

This makes a great side dish, but if you’d like it to be more of a main meal, I would add a little more turkey to it, which I’m noting in the recipe below (the ingredients really fill up the pan, so if you do add extra meat, you may need to cut back on the bread, depending on how deep your baking pan is). This is made in a 2-quart casserole dish (you can also make it in a 9×9″ or 11×7″ baking pan–I used an 11×7″ baking pan).

This casserole is easier to put together if you do the following ahead of time: cut your bread slices into cubes, shred or cube your cooked turkey, shred your Swiss cheese…that way you can just throw all the ingredients in the bowl and mix them up really quick!

FRENCH ONION TURKEY CASSEROLE by NancyCreative, adapted from CampbellsKitchen.com

Makes a 2-quart casserole (you can also use a 9×9″ or 11×7″ baking pan)

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 can (10 1/2 ounces) condensed French Onion Soup
  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 cups shredded Swiss cheese (about 8 ounces), divided
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 2 teaspoons dried thyme, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, optional (if you want a more seasoned flavor)
  • 9 slices of bread (I used honey whole grain oatmeal bread, but you can use white or wheat bread), cut into cubes
  • 2 cups shredded or cubed turkey (if you want a meatier casserole, add an additional 1/2 to 1 cup; if you do this, you may need to cut back on the bread by 1 slice, or your baking pan may be too full)

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Grease or spray a 2-quart shallow pan (or 9×9″ or 11×7″ baking pan). Set aside.

In a large bowl, beat the eggs, soup, and milk, blending well with a fork or whisk. Add 1 cup of the shredded Swiss cheese and 1 Tablespoon of fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon of dried thyme, mixing well. (If using salt, mix this in now, too). Add the bread cubes, stirring and pressing them into the milk mixture to fully coat. Then add the cubed turkey and mix everything well, so ingredients are evenly distributed in mixture.

Pour or spoon the mixture into your baking dish. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese and thyme. Let stand for 15 minutes.

Use your favorite bread. Photo to the right shows what this looks like before it’s put in the oven.

Then bake for 45 minutes at 350˚F or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Here it is fresh out of the oven…

Now you’re ready to dig in! 🙂

Do you have some good recipes of your own for turkey leftovers?

Sharing at Meal Plan Monday,

Sunken Apple Pie Bread

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This recipe was kind of an experiment one day when I was craving an apple dessert. I didn’t have time to make a pie and didn’t have any apples, but I did have a can of apple pie filling. So I tried making this apple bread. I peeked at it while it was baking, and it was rising very nicely. After it was done, looking like a beautifully risen loaf, I let it cool on top of the stove in the loaf pan and went off to do something else for the next 10 to 15 minutes. When I came back, much to my dismay and shock, the loaf had sunken! Really sunken. After staring at it for a few minutes, I decided that it wasn’t quite so bad-looking after all…the sunkeness gave the loaf a somewhat rustic look . I decided to dust it with some powdered sugar and thought that was a nice touch. The more I looked at it, the more I liked it! This imperfect-looking sunken loaf was very appealing to me for some reason.

I still hadn’t tasted it, so that was the next step. Well, I thought it was great–it was very dense and moist…a cross between apple bread and bread pudding. If you’re craving something with an apple pie taste but want something easy and quick, you just may want to try this out. There’s really no way you can mess it up, because it’s going to be sunken…but I just think that adds to the charm of it. And it’s yummy, so who cares if it’s sunken? 🙂 Here’s the recipe if you want to try it out…

SUNKEN APPLE PIE BREAD by NancyCreative

Makes one 9×5″ loaf

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick butter, softened)
  • 1 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (I used unbleached flour)
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 (21-oz.) can apple pie filling
  • powdered sugar for dusting on top of the loaf

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×5″ loaf pan.

Open the can of apple pie filling and spoon entire contents into a small bowl. Cut apple wedges into small chunks (thirds or fourths) with a knife; set aside.

In large bowl, cream softened butter and brown sugar until well-blended. Add eggs and blend well.

In medium bowl, mix flour, baking powder, and cinnamon, blending well. Add these dry ingredients to the butter-sugar-egg mixture, and blend everything well. Then add in the apple pie filling (with your cut-up wedges) and stir mixture until well blended, but don’t over mix.

Pour mixture into your greased and floured 9×5″ loaf pan and bake at 350 degrees for 50 to 60 minutes, or until top of loaf is set and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean (it may not come out totally clean because of the denseness of the bread). If your oven tends to run hot, start checking it at 45 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in pan for 10-15 minutes…it will start sinking into it’s sunken form as it cools.

Remove from pan and dust with powdered sugar while it’s still slightly warm. You can eat it then, or let it completely cool before eating it…the loaf will be easier to slice when it’s completely cool.

Have you done any experimenting in the kitchen lately and been happy with the results?

Linked to Sweets for a Saturday.

Moving and Hot Ham and Cheese Rolls

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I’ve been busy moving these past few weeks, which is why I haven’t been posting much. My little house sold much sooner than I expected (one week, in fact!), so I had to find a rental place really quick! Now I’m in the process of unpacking…I’m not sure which is worse–packing things up, moving them, or unpacking them! I still have more unpacking to do, but the stacks and stacks of boxes are getting smaller…so things should be back to normal in the next few weeks.

Because of the move, I haven’t been cooking much. But a friend of mine, Brian, brought some Hot Ham and Cheese Rolls to work that his wife Elizabeth made and they were so good I asked him if I could share the recipe on my blog. They’re made with frozen bread dough, which cuts down on prep time, and they’re perfect for serving at breakfast or brunch. Brian took some great pictures of these rolls, too, to give you an idea of what they look like. Serve them right out of the oven while the rolls are warm and the cheese is melty, and you won’t be able to stop at just one!

ELIZABETH’S HOT HAM AND CHEESE ROLLS

  • 1 Loaf of frozen bread dough (purchased from the Freezer section of  your grocery store)
  • Ranch dressing
  • 1/4 to 1/2 pound chopped deli ham
  • 4 oz. (or 1/2 of an 8-ounce package) of shredded Parmesan cheese

The night before, place one loaf of frozen bread dough in a glass 9 x 13″ baking dish that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray.  Cover loosely with  plastic wrap that has also been sprayed with nonstick cooking spray.  Place in refrigerator overnight or allow to thaw for a couple of hours on counter.

In the morning, take the dough out of the refrigerator and allow to sit at room temperature for about 15 minutes.  On a lightly-floured surface, gently roll or press dough loaf out into a rectangle shape (about the size of an 11 x 15″ jelly roll pan). Making these are similar to making cinnamon rolls: spread  a light coating of Ranch dressing all over the dough (just as you would spread the butter for cinnamon rolls), then sprinkle the chopped ham over the dressing and then sprinkle the Parmesan cheese over everything.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste, if desired.  You can add garlic salt, too.

Starting with the long side, roll up dough and toppings jelly roll–style (Elizabeth rolls hers about 2 1/2 times). Then pinch to seal the edges all along the length of roll.  Slice into 1-inch slices.  Place rolls, cut side down, in your 9 x 13” glass baking dish that has been sprayed with non-stick spray.  Cover with a towel and let rolls rise for about 30 minutes.  Then bake at 350 degrees for 15 to 17 minutes or until lightly browned.  Makes about 15 to 16 rolls.

Elizabeth adds, “It’s so easy to just go ahead and do two loaves at the same time.  Roll both rolls out, then spread Ranch dressing on both, etc.  Same amount of work for double the rolls!”

Thanks, Elizabeth and Brian, for sharing this yummy recipe!